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“Forget MOOCs – Let’s use MOOA”

MOOCbetterwordbubble“As colleges begin using massive open online courses (MOOC) to reduce faculty costs, a Johns Hopkins University professor has announced plans for MOOA:  Massive Open Online Administrations.  Dr. Benjamin Ginsberg says that many colleges and universities face the same administrative issues every day.  By having one experienced group of administrators make decisions for hundreds of campuses simultaneously, MOOA would help address these problems expeditiously and economically.  Since MOOA would allow colleges to dispense with most of their own administrators, it would generate substantial cost savings in higher education.

“‘Studies show that about 30 percent of the cost increases in higher education over the past twenty-five years have been the result of administrative growth,’ Ginsberg noted.  He suggested that MOOA can reverse this spending growth.  ‘Currently, hundreds, even thousands, of vice provosts and assistant deans attend the same meetings and undertake the same activities on campuses around the U.S. every day,’ he said.  ‘Imagine the cost savings if one vice provost could make these decisions for hundreds of campuses.'”

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tableRelated:  Recall the breakthrough 1988 discovery of Administratium:

“The heaviest element known to science was recently discovered by investigators at a major U.S. research university. The element, tentatively named Administratium, has no protons or electrons and thus has an atomic number of 0. However, it does have one neutron, 125 assistant neutrons, 75 vice neutrons and 111 assistant vice neutrons, which gives it an atomic mass of 312. These 312 particles are held together by a force that involves the continuous exchange of meson-like particles called morons.

“Since it has no electrons, Administratium is inert. However, it can be detected chemically as it impedes every reaction it comes in contact with. According to the discoverers, a minute amount of Administratium causes one reaction to take over four days to complete when it would have normally occurred in less than a second.”

Read more here.

June 16, 2013